Review: Seasons after Fall (PS4)

Review: Seasons after Fall (PS4)

Formats:

  • PlayStation 4
  • Xbox One
  • PC, Mac, Linux

Format/Hardware Used:

  • PSN Download
  • PS4 Pro
  • HDTV

Extras:

  • DualShock 4 Required (1)
  • Move None
Title: Seasons after Fall
Format: PSN (4.7 GB)
Release Date: May 12, 2017
Publisher: Focus Home Interactive
Developer: Swing Swing Submarine
Original MSRP: $19.99 (US), €19.99 (EU), £15.99 (UK)
ESRB Rating: E
PEGI: 3
A copy of this game was provided by the publisher for review purposes.
PS Nation Review Policy

Have you ever stared at a painting or work of art, knowing that people find it beautiful and it seems like only you can see the flaws?

Gameplay:
Seasons after Fall is a lesson in malaise and apathy. It has a nice gameplay mechanic that quickly slides into repetition. You play as a small cute fox that scrabbles up ledges and bounces about the place with a long fluffy tail. You leap across large gaps and follow a linear path toward your goal, then make your way back along the same route.

Your aim is to collect the essence of four seasons, with which you can instantly alter your surroundings to advance in the long tedious map. You can freeze a geyser by blanketing the land in snow and ice allowing your fox to use it as a platform.

Once you have advanced past the first few hurdles after acquiring each season, it all blends into the same old monotonous slog. Just when you are clinging to the hope of an ending, you realize the game is not a short mediocre tale but a long painful trek, retreading the same old paths.

You then reach an agonizing puzzle that requires you to have a photographic memory or physically take a picture of the screen. Some, I fear, will just run back and forth like a fool. It is one of the most boring and laborious tasks I have had to do in a long time. Aren’t video games supposed to be fun?

I forced myself to get through that area only to lose my way in a small system of tunnels and with it, the last morsel of enjoyment. I continued on, after taking a break for a day or so in the hope things would be better after a good night’s sleep. It did not work.

The puzzles are not complicated, just time consuming. There is no hand-holding either and a few players might become stuck without a clue of how to proceed. This might not be an issue for most gamers but I was hoping Seasons after Fall would be a nice introduction into the puzzle platforming genre for the younger and new gamers. It is not.

… This game is mediocrity at its finest …
Visuals:
The guardians held the biggest appeal for me, both in their artistic style and promise of a compelling narrative that never really surfaced. I am certain every other review for the game will gush with admiration and delight at the stunning visual style. It’s like a beautiful painting that comes to life, they will say.

Admittedly, the visuals are the best part of the game, which is a sad thing indeed. The artistic style and handcrafted beauty is only skin deep and fails to hide the dull and dreary gameplay that eventually oozes out of every pore.

Audio:
There is some voice work and it does a nice job of conveying the story if you can pull yourself through the game. The music is great in the early going and then like the rest of the experience, it drags on and becomes rather stale.

Online/Multiplayer:
This game is one player only with no online component.

Conclusion:
Seasons after Fall is a tedious affair that I longed would end. Just when I thought it would, the story took a turn and I realized I had to trudge through the same areas all over again. It became a painful slog across a picturesque landscape.

This game is mediocrity at its finest. Bland and dull gameplay is the only thing I can remember from this apparently beautiful game. Maybe it’s just me. Is everyone else too dazzled to see past the pretty visuals and absurdly repetitive gameplay mechanic?

There’s technically nothing wrong with the game and some might find the difficulty and challenge just right, they might enjoy the lack of help and direction and simply be content exploring the gorgeous world until they stumble upon the right path. You might be that person, I am not.

Score:
5.5

* All screenshots used in this review were taken directly from the game using the Share functionality on the PlayStation 4.

Written by Chazz Harrington

Chazz Harrington

You can find me on everything: PSN, Twitter, Wii U, Origin, Steam, etc using my universal ID: ChazzH69

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